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Don’t Obsess Over Size.

In our society there is an urge to be the biggest and the best. Both are good things (don’t get me wrong). Being the best is a powerful goal and we should all strive to achieve our best effort. But the first goal – biggest – isn’t necessarily what you should be stressing over. I’ve been involved in a number of events lately, and in every case the organizers were stressing over attendance. Will all their efforts bring out the audience numbers that will allow them to brag post event. Granted, when audience numbers directly equate to exhibitors showing, poor attendance can have a negative impact on income.

But as an attendee, I can tell you that it is not the quantity that appeals to me but the quality. Every time I discuss Branding and sales online, I am repeatedly asked for tips as to how a business can achieve fame online. How can they benefit from a sort of Oprah effect. My response is always quality over quantity.

Realistically, what are the chances of being the next Google? Even Google didn’t know they’d be the next Google. I stress looking for your niche. Even if you were to capture just .000001% of the web audience you’d still be fabulously wealthy. Quality over quantity.

In a crowded networking event, competition for attention is exasperated by the shear numbers. In all those bodies, how to narrow the focus is the new challenge. Sometimes a poorly attended networking event works out much better for me. You see, I have to have a conversation with someone before they see my value to them. More times than not, low attendance puts me in front of people who are less distracted and more apt to find out who this guy, ‘Ed Roach’ is. I’ve landed several opportunities from modest audiences that large. Quality over quantity.

Successful sales people can tell you that they would prefer a few good qualified leads than hordes of prospects. Narrow your focus and go for the gold. Doing the other is akin to beating your head against a wall. Quality over quantity.

You could go to a list broker and purchase an immense number of emails to market to. But chances are good that none of these are opt-in and possibly outside of your targeted audience. Isn’t it preferable to speak to an audience of several thousand interested in what you have to say businesses? Building your own niche audience is a desirable goal here.

Quality over quantity.

When you purchase services do look for the best solution, or are you impressed by the size of the competing business? If size impresses you, be aware that chances are only a small contingent of that firm will actually work on your account. You join other fish in that big pond. The smaller firm, appreciates your business more and chances are you will deal directly with the leadership of the company. If you do your due diligence and check who is vying for your business, the little fish reality will ring a bell with you. Quality over quantity.

What ever your goals, don’t underestimate quality over quantity. I’d much rather work for a small number of lucrative accounts that several low paying ones. I don’t work nearly as hard for the same income. It also gives me latitude to growing my business in a positive environment. Paying attention to your audience will pay dividends and allow you to benefit from the quality your brand will attract.

One Response to Don’t Obsess Over Size.

  1. Meheer Thakare Reply

    March 8, 2010 at 1:16 am

    A good point there ED. More often than not we find Big Organizations unable to enforce their Brand values and practices at the level zero. Several huge companies in Asia and AUS/NZ belong to this category (What is the scene in the West?)

    People are the lower-hierarchies are often at the front-end especially in B2C markets. Motivating such employees to work in accordance the brand values advertised to the masses, is a challenge many fail to win against.

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